Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26

Featuring Dylan Hughes

Bassist, Composer, Singer, Arranger, Engineer, Video Host

Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes Bryan At Mackncheeze

Dylan Hughes – Bass Player, Singer, Songwriter, Composer, Arranger, Producer, Engineer, Educator and Video Host.  Dylan Shares his technical expertise, inspiration and passion for his art. Dylan Hughes Music Dylan Hughes Music Courses The Lover A Love Supreme Mackncheeze Music Bryan at Mackncheeze
  1. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes
  2. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 25: Featuring William Kenower
  3. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 24: Featuring Arami Walker
  4. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 23: Featuring Robert Brewer
  5. Mackncheeze Music Podcast# 22: Featuring Chris Littlefield
  6. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 21: Featuring Ed Maloney, Music Promoter, Producer and Former Owner of Seattle's Highway 99 Blues Club
  7. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 20: Featuring Blues Artist, Darnell Scott
  8. Mackncheeze Podcast # 19: Featuring Danny Godinez
  9. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 18: Steve Smith of the Seattle Drum School
  10. Mackncheeze Music Podcast# 17: Featuring Daniel Haff of Crooked Label Brewing

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The Compelling Reasons

Why are we driven to do the things we do? I can only speak for myself.

Need

I have to play music, record and associate with like minded people. There is no choice. How do I know? I have tried not to, and by the same token, have been left completely disenfranchised.

I wanted this at seven. As I grew older, the importance coalesced more and more into my thought process. I wanted to play music, be immersed with people who thought the same way, deep in those relationships.

I choose to do this yet it feels like it chose me.

Call it compulsion, if you will.

Love

I love to, I love to, I love to. Sitting in front of the flat screen, editing away into the night, wood shedding hour after hour, playing out. Does it get any better?

Which leads to a calling. Anything I have done has never been as satisfying; love, jobs, sports and business ownership. Anything worth doing needs to involve music, right down to my spiritual life. Emotional trouble and anxiety ensue if there is no focus on musicality.

As I am more and more entrenched I have more belief. Each action is faith in motion, each act reinforces the direction I am pining for.

Excitement

At times prospects of what can be achieved seem limitless. It’s an eyes wide open, marveling at the possibilities, sort of thing. Opportunity is everywhere and alternate paths to my destination abound.

Why not be excited? It’s akin to being a kid in a candy shop, in addition to Christmas Morning. What is today’s gift? I can’t wait to unwrap it.

Association

Artistically driven people understand me. There is commonality among us. In this area of life there are no meaningless coincidences; my path seems clear.

One of my podcast guests brought up the sacredness of our habits and mind sets. It really is a correlation of practice, creation and performance which verges on the religious. It is analogous to being in a constant state of prayer, participating with a musical illuminati, the enlightened ones.

I hang with people I like, people who inspire me, who make me laugh. I try to stay away from people who spout negativity, who are close minded and toxic.

Happiness is a choice.

Vision

There’s no definition to certain success. To do so almost surely predicts failure. Keeping an eye on the prize doesn’t necessarily mean we’re going to win it. Yet the focus on attainment can deliver unsuspected rewards. Maybe that release date has been delayed, but what did you learn in the process. Did you come out smarter and more resilient? Perhaps that sets the stage for the next level of achievement.

Nothing is going to change tomorrow. Because nothing is going to change, I give myself permission to improve and to fail, making the slightest change today, tomorrow and everyday after. I move closer to my objectives while at the same time keeping my line of sight clear and focused.

Momentum, Baby, is everything.

Ambition

If something exists, then it must be possible.

Every day matters. Aspiration accomplished is the result of compounded daily tasks. Reaching inside of ourselves, moving forward, taking on the inconvenience and sacrifice of time, panting after our hopes; these things move us forward.

Things we have set our eyes upon won’t come to us in one day. Throw goals out the window. There is only process and habit. What ever you are aspiring to achieve – practice, practice, practice.

Accomplishment

Learning something new can take time. If it is worth having, worth mastering, there is nothing that negates the task. It’s in those daily victories which express who I am.

Understanding musical notation does not make you a musician. It is through years of practice, developing your subconscious automatic response to performance, which makes you a performer.

The world rewards energy and motion. It favors action over inaction, even if the results seem uncertain. I adhere strongly to this principle, regarding it as a positive approach to life.

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Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 25

Featuring William Kenower

Author, Lecturer, Coach

Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes Bryan At Mackncheeze

Dylan Hughes – Bass Player, Singer, Songwriter, Composer, Arranger, Producer, Engineer, Educator and Video Host.  Dylan Shares his technical expertise, inspiration and passion for his art. Dylan Hughes Music Dylan Hughes Music Courses The Lover A Love Supreme Mackncheeze Music Bryan at Mackncheeze
  1. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes
  2. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 25: Featuring William Kenower
  3. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 24: Featuring Arami Walker
  4. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 23: Featuring Robert Brewer
  5. Mackncheeze Music Podcast# 22: Featuring Chris Littlefield
  6. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 21: Featuring Ed Maloney, Music Promoter, Producer and Former Owner of Seattle's Highway 99 Blues Club
  7. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 20: Featuring Blues Artist, Darnell Scott
  8. Mackncheeze Podcast # 19: Featuring Danny Godinez
  9. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 18: Steve Smith of the Seattle Drum School
  10. Mackncheeze Music Podcast# 17: Featuring Daniel Haff of Crooked Label Brewing

Can we help you?

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Vision

Working for the man, I hear terms like mission statements, objectives, purpose, values and vision. What do I get when I utilize search engines for a definition of vision? A bunch of corporate speak on the how, why and variations on said subject. Seems to me it’s a parroting of various courses offered by universities.

Does this define my consideration of vision?

Practicing vision gives me the chance to close my eyes and see the fulfillment of my dreams and aspirations. If I were where I wanted to be, how would that appear? It’s been said a person should visualize the end point of the journey and work backwards; what contributed to the trek and how did it look?

I’m not talking about visualizing world peace, eliminating hunger, solving homelessness or any of humanities nobler goals. I recognize vision for these virtuous ends as super important, but it seems like a crazy hallucination. There is so much I can not change.

My Vision Is Personalized

Any of my two to five year plans didn’t work; did they for you? Besides, if you are like me you change your mind a lot. It doesn’t mean a person is a flake or indecisive. Particulars and circumstances are not static; perhaps therein lies a bit of wisdom in rearranging my thought process.

The most important vision I can actualize is for myself and for my family.

In the past I have floundered along with out being able to see my destination. At most times my line of sight was directed towards what others thought I should be looking for. Family, corporation, church, girl friends, chums…Funny thing, there are a whole lot of people out there who are willing to tell me what my vision should be, but who are actualizing their line of sight as if it were mine.

And They Wonder How Come I’m Not Smarter

Always, in the front and back of my mind, I have had to be involved in music. I can’t, nor do I want to, leave it behind. Put music down, sell all my gear and after season I would be right back at it.

There are tons of people more qualified and far more successful, so why pursue it? The thing is, I can’t comprehend giving up.

Over the years what I have seen in my future changes. From the heady days of spending month after month on the road, quietly playing in weekend club bands, working in original acts, writing music, to putting together my own recording studio. The vision I had at twenty two is not the vision I have today.

Vision ties in with things I’m passionate about. When there was no line of sight, or when I lived in the expectations of others, there was no real excitement, no anticipation, just mindless wandering. I am now able to see past the garbage and work towards that which does not yet exist. What I imagine is an out come tied to my understanding of myself, my thoughts, my situation.

Those who have thought and conceptualized their vision for me also have directed me on a path of fulfillment. “Do this and that,” they say, “and you will realize the other thing. Listen to my words and do as so-and-so did and blah, blah, blah…”

We are not often told how much a person needs to put aside to realize their dreams. I am not willing to sacrifice for someone else’s vision. What once delighted me as far as social expectations and responsibilities are now sidelined with not a single regret.

I’m sure that those who have gone before us did not walk down a perfectly straight line; they did not hit every road marker that identified their highway, did not celebrate every little victory and achievement, their plotted course wasn’t always true north. But what they could do was communicate eloquently where they saw themselves headed and deal with challenges in the way. They fought, and continue to fight, the good fight.

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In Process

I consider my ego a tool, as opposed as to reflection of who I am. The sweet spot of my self confidence is strongly correlated within the function of my belief that I can do more than facts suggest. I’m waiting to see how this all turns out.

Of course this applies to music, the studio and related various projects.

Am I putting up a facade and hoping you buy it? Maybe. Inflating a version of my true self allows me to relax and play the style of my projected character.

I got that going for me, which is nice.

Does this make me a lot like you?

In the Wizard of Oz, did you notice the only person who knew the wizard was bluffing was Toto?

Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.

Because of his projection of confidence and power, all of Oz thought he was more than he was.

We are all deeply flawed. Pretending that it is otherwise would be silly. How many times have I been wrong in a situation where I thought I was dead to rights in my beliefs?

I’m really bad at predicting the future. That’s why we have experts and they, also, are usually wrong.

I have found asking a lot of questions lends to the appearance of having control of a situation. In this process, I think of things I’m good at, which is a reminder of my determination and abilities.

I truly enjoy people and their successes. The way I look at it, if you succeed in an endeavor, I win, because I can look at you and take notes.

Getting back to ego…as an artist it is super hard to separate myself from the implications of my craft. I want to hear that all my ideas are amazing, when they probably aren’t. I certainly don’t want my ego making decisions for me. That’s not practicable.

So I will continue this practice of dialing my ego up and down as the situation warrants. Sometimes people want to hear how good I think I am, but most times not. They want me to hear how good they think they are.

Blaze on warrior, and I’ll follow. Maybe you will have the giant’s shoulders I’ll stand upon.

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Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 19

Featuring Danny Godinez

Guitarist, Songwriter, Producer

Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes Bryan At Mackncheeze

Dylan Hughes – Bass Player, Singer, Songwriter, Composer, Arranger, Producer, Engineer, Educator and Video Host.  Dylan Shares his technical expertise, inspiration and passion for his art. Dylan Hughes Music Dylan Hughes Music Courses The Lover A Love Supreme Mackncheeze Music Bryan at Mackncheeze
  1. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes
  2. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 25: Featuring William Kenower
  3. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 24: Featuring Arami Walker
  4. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 23: Featuring Robert Brewer
  5. Mackncheeze Music Podcast# 22: Featuring Chris Littlefield

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Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 18

Steve Smith, Percussionist, Music Professional, Engineer, Producer and Author, Shares his Musical Expertise

Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes Bryan At Mackncheeze

Dylan Hughes – Bass Player, Singer, Songwriter, Composer, Arranger, Producer, Engineer, Educator and Video Host.  Dylan Shares his technical expertise, inspiration and passion for his art. Dylan Hughes Music Dylan Hughes Music Courses The Lover A Love Supreme Mackncheeze Music Bryan at Mackncheeze
  1. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes
  2. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 25: Featuring William Kenower
  3. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 24: Featuring Arami Walker
  4. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 23: Featuring Robert Brewer
  5. Mackncheeze Music Podcast# 22: Featuring Chris Littlefield

Is there any way we can help you?

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Perspective Is A Super Power

What if I could just go back and do it over? The age old concept of being smarter at a younger age.

I guess that brings up being regretful for previous actions and decisions. Some of the undertakings and determinations I have made require contriteness. Feelings of guilt and self recrimination have literally haunted my thoughts for years, affecting self-esteem and confidence. Sometimes there have been fears of an imagined confrontation from those I have wronged.

Instead of continuing this cycle of mild paranoia, I have decided to embrace the concept of Pronoia. What is Pronoia, you may ask? It is the delusional belief that people are plotting my well being and saying nice things about me behind my back. It might be my own little world but at least they know me there.

So what have I learned?

To not be concerned with how I am perceived by others.

Understanding that speaking insulting words or practicing actions of even casual malice are things that usually can not be taken back.

Clear and defined convictions give me dividing lines and direction that keep me focused on goals.

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This Tool Ain’t Getting Any Sharper

I have serious management potential. I believe I care enough to actually affect change.

Yep, Sharp as a marble.

A few bricks shy of a load.

Not the brightest spoon in the drawer nor sharpest tool in the shed.

I have spent a life time pursuing my dreams. Of course there have been interruptions and distractions: Love, financial attainment, work commitments, family, you know. A long life’s path are many decisions, good and bad.

I have made a daily habit of searching for new ideas. This been an extremely interesting process. First rule: there is no such thing as a good or bad idea. It’s just an idea. The most important thing is to get the idea out.

I have read that turning over ideas and writing them down actually increases brain strength; approach the brain as a muscle that needs to be exercised. Idea crunches? I don’t know.

Like I said, there are no bad ideas, they are just ideas. I started by just throwing cocepts out there. Example: Go back to school, great thought, right? But is it practicable? For me, no; for some one else, maybe. Ideas are just ideas – be a garbage man, start a deli, walk pets, be a bicycle mechanic, drive an ice cream truck, buy a dry cleaner, work as a grocery clerk…

Here’s the kicker…for me, only one in a thousand ideas is even worth acting upon. So, ten ideas a day times 365 days = 3,650 ideas. If I am lucky, that’s 3 ideas a year that are worthy of follow up. Actually, I think my average is lower.

For an idea to be worth acting upon, it needs to meet criterion, like, is it feasible? Also, is it simple? Does the idea actually resonate with my inner core values? It has to be something that is in line with my passions and goals; if it’s not, I’m not going to be very interested in follow through. Consistency and persistency is the concept I embrace in everything.

I’m not yet a dazzling financial success, but I have embraced the process of growth. I’m blessed in that I have my health and a good, solid foundation in many areas of my life. Everyday I fire my endorphins with different areas of achievement, constantly improving some small area of my life, which will show exponentially at the end of a years practice.

Is there any way we can help you?

We appreciate comments and suggestions. Thanks for reading. You know where to find us.

Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 16

Featuring Adam Puchalski

of Wind Studios

Deciding Instrumentation and Voicings

in Recording Projects

Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes Bryan At Mackncheeze

Dylan Hughes – Bass Player, Singer, Songwriter, Composer, Arranger, Producer, Engineer, Educator and Video Host.  Dylan Shares his technical expertise, inspiration and passion for his art. Dylan Hughes Music Dylan Hughes Music Courses The Lover A Love Supreme Mackncheeze Music Bryan at Mackncheeze
  1. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes
  2. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 25: Featuring William Kenower
  3. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 24: Featuring Arami Walker
  4. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 23: Featuring Robert Brewer
  5. Mackncheeze Music Podcast# 22: Featuring Chris Littlefield

Can we help you in any way?

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How To Herd Cats

This Is A Bit Of A Stretch…

Definition Of A Cat:

Evidently Cab Calloway coined the term in the 30’s. Back in 1938, he published Cab Calloway’s Cat-ologue: A “Hepster’s” Dictionary. Wikipedia has a great page on the origins of Jive; vastly entertaining.

A “Cat” could have been a jazz musician in a New Orleans whore house. Or simply the demeanor of players as they strutted on to stage or into their solos; stretching it out, like a cat.

So, yeah, I’m sort of using a double entendre here. Herding cats is a metaphor which emphasizes herding that which is incapable of being herded. Cats, i.e., musicians.

I have utmost respect for my friends who have been capable of keeping their bands together year in and year out with super low turn over of personnel.

My experience is contrary. I have run bands, with mediocre outcomes. I have experienced lack of interest, motivation and dedication coupled with politicizing. Let’s not forget about flat out prima donnas.

The same challenge has risen its head in the studio. Trying to keep folks focused, even on their own projects, can become totally frustrating. Scheduled day of recording, not even a phone call to cancel. Sure hope you ain’t hurt or in trouble. A text takes, what, 10 seconds, max?

How about all the times I have been asked to attend meetings in various projects in which I’m involved . Sometimes not even the person who called the meeting shows up.

The flip side; I’m trying to help others hook up with people who might be able to support and help. Ah, the beautiful Seattle passive / aggressive. “Yes, I will be there.” Not even a peep when the person doesn’t show.

My favorite: “Would you be interested in an interview?”

“Sure, how much you paying me?”

Only time will tell if you are that great.

Will a carrot and a stick work? How about a day timer and a whip? I suppose that’s not too practicable.

Last thought – A good friend offered me the chance to record my podcasts at his world class studio.

Instant scheduling nightmare.

Don’t you know, “I float like a butterfly and sting like bee.” I’m stealing quotes from Mohammad Ali.

May we help you?

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Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 15

https://sarahpinzon.com

Sarah Pinzon, L.A. Recording and Session Artist, Lead Singer of Hell’s Belles

Think you got what it takes to make it in the L.A. studio scene? Sarah Pinzon works as a session player and artist. Check out Mackncheeze Podcast # 15 and find out if you have the grit to do likewise.

Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes Bryan At Mackncheeze

Dylan Hughes – Bass Player, Singer, Songwriter, Composer, Arranger, Producer, Engineer, Educator and Video Host.  Dylan Shares his technical expertise, inspiration and passion for his art. Dylan Hughes Music Dylan Hughes Music Courses The Lover A Love Supreme Mackncheeze Music Bryan at Mackncheeze
  1. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes
  2. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 25: Featuring William Kenower
  3. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 24: Featuring Arami Walker
  4. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 23: Featuring Robert Brewer
  5. Mackncheeze Music Podcast# 22: Featuring Chris Littlefield

Can we help in any way?

We appreciate comments and suggestions. Thanks for reading. You know where to find us.

Seven Examples Of Counting The Cost

What are you willing to give up to chase your dreams? If we want it badly, we have got to sacrifice.

Obsession, it’s what we do regardless what is happening. First thing in the morning pounding it out. Last thing at night, getting the final two cents in.

Priorities:

Woody Allen: “80 percent of the game is showing up.”

Warren Buffett: “Really Successful People Say No To Almost Everything”

I have read that I should think like my prey; it’s an old concept. Not that I’m trying to sell anybody anything, or eat anyone, except that there might be a possibility we could help one another.

That’s what my podcasts are all about. As well as my You Tube Channel.

Life is a big process of negotiation, ask any parent. I’m not a parent, but I know lots of parents.

Toxic relationships will not facilitate progress, inspiration or direction.

Health is an underlying factor, if I am not well, how am I going to able to move forward.

A band I was in, years ago, was a dedicated bunch. Three rehearsals a week, staging, PA, light show and a big semi-trailer to haul it. It was all about the show.

We would do gigs in 24 hour stints. Load in at 5:30 am, hit the road for two to four hours, load out, play the gig, load the truck, drive home, unload by 6 am the next morning. That’s commitment, a shared devotion to a cause, each person involved having reason for being there, from the musicians to the road crew.

I’m not afraid to work and collaborate, as long as my vision crosses path with someone else’s, consider me in.

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Mackncheeze Music Podcast #13: Sean Farchild

Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes Bryan At Mackncheeze

Dylan Hughes – Bass Player, Singer, Songwriter, Composer, Arranger, Producer, Engineer, Educator and Video Host.  Dylan Shares his technical expertise, inspiration and passion for his art. Dylan Hughes Music Dylan Hughes Music Courses The Lover A Love Supreme Mackncheeze Music Bryan at Mackncheeze
  1. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes
  2. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 25: Featuring William Kenower
  3. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 24: Featuring Arami Walker
  4. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 23: Featuring Robert Brewer
  5. Mackncheeze Music Podcast# 22: Featuring Chris Littlefield

Can we help you in any way?

We appreciate comments and suggestions. Thanks for reading. You know where to find us.

K.I.S.S.

Keep It Simple Stupid

I first learned of the K.I.S.S. concept in college jazz lab band. The professor, a horn player by the name of Bart, introduced the notion to soloists. I loved Bart; he was awesome.

Evidently there are two ways to interpret K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Stupid, or, Keep It Simple, Stupid. I always considered the latter as proper interpretation. Evidently, the U.S. Navy, who by the way, coined the acronym, identifies with the former. Just keeping things stupid simple, or simple stupid, alleviates greater frequency of errors.

I’ve always thought in terms of, “Hey Stupid, keep it simple.” But that’s me and my sarcastic mind set.

I think it is a perfect way to interpret a mix, especially when starting with a foundation. Simplify, keeping the concept stupid simple, identify your substructure: drums, vocals, melody, rhythm tracks, use your own judgment, then base your mix on that.

I constantly cross reference mixes from the big boys, using compromised sound sources ( iPhone speakers, bluetooth speakers, crappy head phones, extremely low volume near-field play back, listening from another room, car stereos while driving…)

For me, the ultimate foundational K.I.S.S. mixing technique: Isolate the kick and the lead vocals. Make those two voices as musical as possible, then move on. That’s what I do. E.Q. and compress the kick drum and vocals and blend them the best I am able; everything else follows.

K.I.S.S. can also be applied to personal rehearsal. Being a drummer, I imagine the concept is much less complex. I break down rhythmic passages into 2’s and 3’s and slow the metronome to excrutiatingly slow BPM, requiring painful concentration, actually making my brain hurt.

When practicing like this, I can actually feel new neural paths carving different channels through my brain. I have told this can delay Alzheimer’s but does nothing to alleviate Some Timers or Delayed Intelligence.

In all my endeavors, I try to start with as basic as an idea as possible. It’s overthinking that complicates matters.

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Mackncheeze Music Podcast 11

An Interview with Knuckles Front Man Dan Manier and Guitarist Sean Hudson

Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes Bryan At Mackncheeze

Dylan Hughes – Bass Player, Singer, Songwriter, Composer, Arranger, Producer, Engineer, Educator and Video Host.  Dylan Shares his technical expertise, inspiration and passion for his art. Dylan Hughes Music Dylan Hughes Music Courses The Lover A Love Supreme Mackncheeze Music Bryan at Mackncheeze
  1. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes
  2. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 25: Featuring William Kenower
  3. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 24: Featuring Arami Walker
  4. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 23: Featuring Robert Brewer
  5. Mackncheeze Music Podcast# 22: Featuring Chris Littlefield

Can we help you in any way?

https://www.mackncheeze.com/

We appreciate comments and suggestions. You know where to find us. Thanks for listening.

Fat Fingers

Chubby digits, that’s what I got. What I mean is – I make a lot of mistakes. I blame my mistakes on my five thumbs which are attached to both of my hands. Generally, fat fingers applies to any editing program I might be working with: photo, video, audio, text… all of them.

The wrong command is pressed, Fat Fingers. Forgot to save the project, Fat Fingers. Turn off the lap top by accident, fat fingers.

It’s important to remember to concentrate on the moment. I find myself so easily distracted, bouncing around from concept to concept, action to action, in a huge hurry to get to my next destination. My chubby digits hit the wrong command, and bam, there I go again, off to another error.

That’s one of the reasons I avoid flat screen control devices. I don’t know how many times I have been mixing with an iPad app, and one careless brush of my little finger, kapow, I turn off an entire sub mix. Makes for very interesting performances.

Chubby digits, that’s what I got.

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Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 10:

Adam Puchalski and Bryan Discuss EQ and Panning For Application In Home Studios

Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes Bryan At Mackncheeze

Dylan Hughes – Bass Player, Singer, Songwriter, Composer, Arranger, Producer, Engineer, Educator and Video Host.  Dylan Shares his technical expertise, inspiration and passion for his art. Dylan Hughes Music Dylan Hughes Music Courses The Lover A Love Supreme Mackncheeze Music Bryan at Mackncheeze
  1. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes
  2. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 25: Featuring William Kenower
  3. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 24: Featuring Arami Walker
  4. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 23: Featuring Robert Brewer
  5. Mackncheeze Music Podcast# 22: Featuring Chris Littlefield

Can we help you in any way?

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Mackncheeze Podcast # 9

Eric Ritts Shares Insights On Marco Bass Guitars

marcobassguitars.com

Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes Bryan At Mackncheeze

Dylan Hughes – Bass Player, Singer, Songwriter, Composer, Arranger, Producer, Engineer, Educator and Video Host.  Dylan Shares his technical expertise, inspiration and passion for his art. Dylan Hughes Music Dylan Hughes Music Courses The Lover A Love Supreme Mackncheeze Music Bryan at Mackncheeze
  1. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes
  2. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 25: Featuring William Kenower
  3. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 24: Featuring Arami Walker
  4. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 23: Featuring Robert Brewer
  5. Mackncheeze Music Podcast# 22: Featuring Chris Littlefield

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Getting The Mix

Getting a great mix can be very tough. Recording well requires quality inputs, correct performance, and extreme listening skills. The adage, “It’s not the gear, it’s the ear” holds a lot of truth. Better listening begets qualitative judgement, which enhances desire for equipment that can satisfy ever expanding qualitative judgement, which creates gear sluts, people who always need some better gear. That’s me.

Of course subjectivity is involved, but its more satisfying to be objectively subjective (oxymoron, maybe) when proper equipment is utilized.

My first real studio experience was when I was 19. We had no idea our band was terrible. Spending three hours recording four cover tunes on traditional two inch tape and some big console, excitement and expectations were huge. The engineers mixed it out for us in about a half hour. Those big old JBL studio monitors sounded great at full tilt; you know, loud is best. We were presented a cassette tape of our session which promptly went on to the car stereo.

Feeling like rock stars, disappointment was huge when we compared our three hour session to cassettes produced by big labels. We had no understanding that those projects could take weeks and months of ten to twelve hour days before release. And that’s before mastering. Mastering?

We understood nothing. Sometimes it still feels that way.

Is there anyway we can help?

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Finding My Core Values

I have been on a path of discovery. Since I have started blogging I have had to do a lot of inner searching. I understand that I need to be who I am and not try to fake my way through this process. Friends who read my blog have told me that that they can actually hear my voice when they read it.

That is good news. I really desire that I focus on others and get their stories out. The way I see it, we are all in this together, and if we can have our paths converge on different parts of our journeys, more power to all of us.

I’ll scratch your back and you can scratch mine, so to speak.

It seems almost all my projects require collaboration with others. If I had a budget and I could afford to hire musicians out, I would. But funds are limited, knowledge is limited and I can use all the help I can get. I’m not a one person show, nor do I want to be.

I thrive on social interaction. What better way to be sociable than to work and share my passion for music and creativity.

In the midst of trying to achieving these things, what is really needed is a fundamental change in my attitude toward life. I have to learn who I am and that it does not really matter what my expectations may be, but rather what life expects from me. In that, I desire to help as many others as I am able.

Is there any way we can help?

Inspiration

I choose to hang with folks who are smarter, more talented and more driven than myself.

Daily, I take time to read and garner other peoples ideas, checking to see if their concepts and practices are adaptable to my circumstance. I think I have applied maybe 1 out of 1000 suggestions. You might think it takes a lot of time to do this. I ain’t going to lie, it does. This habit is actually an extension of personal rehearsal and reading habits. I understand the results of constantly applying myself, seeing no immediate return on my efforts. It’s a cumulative effect; more fuel creates a bigger flame.

As you can imagine, 1 out of 1000 ideas acted upon isn’t a huge return. Face it, most concepts I look at aren’t that great and most are just flat out stupid. That’s okay, I can live with it.

The biggest result is increase of process. My process is far greater now than when I first started churning out ideas. I spent the first months of idea gathering just thinking of anything and writing it down. Any concept is worth writing down, no matter how dumb or inaccessible.

Still, the biggest purveyor of new ideas acted upon is personal rehearsal. Music is a limitless world of possibilities. Virtuosity is achievable in so many different genres, it is truly mind blowing. I believe that music has direct connection to elements of the universe; I see and understand this more and more.

Back to my first statement: I can’t over emphasize how important friends are for inspirational growth. Because they are who they are, just being around them is a form of collaboration. For me, innocuous collusion is cool. It is truly awesome to sit in front of the console and flat screen, together, piecing out arrangements, parts and voicings.

In my world, friendship is everything.

Can we help you in any way?

Mackncheeze Music Podcast 6

Finding High Quality Guitars On A Budget

We are podcasting on iTunes, Spotify, Google Podcast, Breaker, Pocket Casts, Overcast and Radio Public. Just key in Bryan at Mackncheeze, or click the link below.

Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes Bryan At Mackncheeze

Dylan Hughes – Bass Player, Singer, Songwriter, Composer, Arranger, Producer, Engineer, Educator and Video Host.  Dylan Shares his technical expertise, inspiration and passion for his art. Dylan Hughes Music Dylan Hughes Music Courses The Lover A Love Supreme Mackncheeze Music Bryan at Mackncheeze
  1. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes
  2. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 25: Featuring William Kenower
  3. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 24: Featuring Arami Walker
  4. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 23: Featuring Robert Brewer
  5. Mackncheeze Music Podcast# 22: Featuring Chris Littlefield

Can we help you in any way?

Goals

My absolute, top priority is to become a better player. Honestly, I believe I require practice four hours per day to actually achieve needed results. I know this is true; when I can consistently commit time day in, day out, week in, week out, I rise above plateaus and keep pressing on.

I have spent years reading self help books, sometimes so formulaic I feel like I’m just absorbing drivel. The usual recipe: write down my goals, visualize, journal, associate with people smarter than me, identify what I want, consistency, persistency, embrace passion. Yep all that.

The biggest take away from all of it? There is no guarantee of outcome. Life is fragile and so much of our journey depends upon good relationships, health, both physical and mental, willingness to work with others and to be able to give of ourselves.

Having done this, maybe I haven’t done enough. What I have learned is that my success is the process; I have not become who I am today without it. Any of my abilities has been developed through patience and humble recognition that there is always more to be done. I can see where I want to go, what I want to do, be it tomorrow, next week, next month, next year. Since I can’t control the outcome, all I can do is control the process.

I have come to a place of acceptance and gratitude. I know, no matter what, I would be driven to improve musically. I have walked away from pursuing music for extended periods of years and perspective has shown me I was immensely unsettled, discontent, facing turmoil, confused and seeking after things which I was not made for.

Can we help you?

Mackncheeze Music Podcast Episode 5

Crazy Things Can Happen At Gigs!

An interview with Eric Ritts (Marco Bass Guitars) and Sean Hudson (Guitarist for Knuckles and The Disco Cowboys).

We are Podcasting on iTunes, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Breaker, Pocket Casts, Overcast and Radio Public. Just key in Bryan at Mackncheeze or click the link below.

Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes Bryan At Mackncheeze

Dylan Hughes – Bass Player, Singer, Songwriter, Composer, Arranger, Producer, Engineer, Educator and Video Host.  Dylan Shares his technical expertise, inspiration and passion for his art. Dylan Hughes Music Dylan Hughes Music Courses The Lover A Love Supreme Mackncheeze Music Bryan at Mackncheeze
  1. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes
  2. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 25: Featuring William Kenower
  3. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 24: Featuring Arami Walker
  4. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 23: Featuring Robert Brewer
  5. Mackncheeze Music Podcast# 22: Featuring Chris Littlefield

Is there anyway we can help you?

Embarrassment

We all have been there. Forgetting our vocal line, missing the cue, blowing the arrangement; one domino falls over and the entire band goes with it. As uncomfortable as it can be, revealing our disappointment on stage, telling the audience how badly its been blown with body language and comments to one another, should never occur.

I, for one, take mistakes very personally. I believe I can perform at a higher standard, never comparing myself to others, but comparing myself to myself. My personal standards are much too high and that’s not right to lay on someone else.

They, who ever they are, say that public speaking is considered one the most fearful experiences a person can have. How about botching parts on stage and throwing everyone off? Particularly annoying is working with sequences and not playing the proper arrangement: oops, that was the chorus but here we all are at a verse.

How do you fake your way out of that? Well, you just do. Sometimes you stop; it can’t be taken back.

How about most of the band being half in the bag by first down beat? Don’t worry, by the third set they will all be fully in; that’s when the fun starts.

One of the things I love about all of this is how thick my skin has become; it is becoming ever more difficult to shame myself. I used to become mortified at mistakes but now I recognize blunders as Standard Operating Procedure. I attribute my complacency to error as part of a humans ability to adapt. My personal evolution has gone from being disconcerted by failure to owning the mistake. Let’s just see if I can consciously repeat the flub next measure. Call it technique.

Can we help you in anyway?

Mackncheeze Podcast Episode 4

https://www.windstudiomusic.com

Adam Puchalski – click the http://www.windstudiomusic.com link

We are Podcasting on iTunes, Spotify, Google Podcast, Breaker, Pocket Casts, Overcast and Radio Public. Key in Bryan at Mackncheeze.

Or just click the link below…

Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes Bryan At Mackncheeze

Dylan Hughes – Bass Player, Singer, Songwriter, Composer, Arranger, Producer, Engineer, Educator and Video Host.  Dylan Shares his technical expertise, inspiration and passion for his art. Dylan Hughes Music Dylan Hughes Music Courses The Lover A Love Supreme Mackncheeze Music Bryan at Mackncheeze
  1. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes
  2. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 25: Featuring William Kenower
  3. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 24: Featuring Arami Walker
  4. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 23: Featuring Robert Brewer
  5. Mackncheeze Music Podcast# 22: Featuring Chris Littlefield

Is there any thing we can do to help?

No Good Deed Goes Unpunished

Yep, lent a drum throne to a one my drummer friends. Never saw it again. Hey man, that ain’t a book, it’s a drum throne; it has importance and a purpose.

Drove the band across state, did any one offer to help with gas?

Booked the gig, provided the P.A., set up the equipment and the vocalists arrive five minutes before down beat.

Provided the rehearsal space but still got fired from the band, “Hey Man, can we still rehearse here?”

Gave the client a pre mix, they used it for their project, never paid me.

Lent out a powered speaker to a friend, had to go get it at someone else’s house.

To quote The Bard himself, “So shines a good deed in a weary world.”

Can we help you in any way? Worry not, we are sincere.

Where Was I ?

My brain constantly fires on all cylinders; I can’t keep up. The distractions are endless.

Like walking through the front door and leaving a trail of keys, wallet, phone and whatever else my hands happened to be clutching. It’s like a slug trail, except it’s not slime, but an ephemeral path I will retrace sometime within an hour, trying to remember where I left stuff.

A big joke around my house: I’m watching television, maybe I was drinking, maybe, looking for chow de dow in the fridge, and suddenly I can’t find the remote. Scouring high and low, frustrated on the misplacement of the channel changer, looking for a new beer…AHA! I find the controller in the Frigidaire next to the cheese. Makes sense.

I’m not ADA, but I’m always somewhere else, or so it seems. Ever since I was a small child, I have had this endless stream of music running through my brain. My coworkers know that I always have a song to sing to them. One of my friends has told me that everyone I know gets a theme song. It’s not everyone, only the people I like. Sorry everyone else. No theme song, uhh, not sure how to say this…

How about mixing a track? When I’m getting close to the end of a mix, I throw a track into my near fields and turn up the volume as loud as possible. I wander around home pretending I’m, like, doing house work, or something domestic. What I’m actually doing is listening with my subconscious, letting my brain hear things that previous concentration has missed. And there is a lot I miss because I’m constantly distracted.

Setting down to woodshed; concentration is a key element. I get about twenty minutes in to an exercise and then I say to myself, “Bry, what if you simplify this in such a way?”

Oops, turns out I’m borderline incompetent in the simplification of said exercise. Great…turn the metronome BPMs way down and learn how to play it slow. Plug away for twenty minutes and realize there is another way to fail another variation of the exercise.

Maybe I got something better to do, like, something not as challenging, or cleaning the bathroom, or cooking dinner, or finding my keys.

Is there anything we can do to help you?

Brain Damaged

I’m not sure what I did. Rumor has it, as an infant, I was dropped on my head. I don’t know, I can’t remember. Perhaps my amygdala smashed in to my hippocampus, resulting in memory loss. Could have been the drugs or maybe my continuing love of alcohol. Or that last bicycle accident; was that a traffic divider, or a guard rail?

How many times must I make the same mistakes before I figure it out? There must be something amiss in my grey matter’s neural pathways. How many times am I going to blame my circumstance before figuring out I am my circumstance?

Personal accountability is the key.

Why do I do what I do?

Is there any way we can help you?

Don’t Forget To Laugh

One of my nicknames is Chuckles; I snigger a lot. There’s too much that could make me cry, so I choose to counter with a grin and a snort, embracing absurdity. Yeah, man, life is too short and difficult.

Another nickname is Pelon. My Latin friends gave me that name but usually there is a preface that I won’t mention. It’s quite amusing in Spanish but the English equivalent translates in very harsh terms. The first time I heard it I almost cried I thought it was so funny.

My journey along this path has been littered with countless failures and disappointments; I could dwell on those ad nauseam but what’s the point. I choose to find humor in life’s challenges because of the monumental ironies which preclude its course.

Those I choose as my friends need to have thick skins, big smiles and the ability to shrug off the inevitable shortcomings of this existence.

Laughter is the best medicine, so they say.

Is there any way we can help you?

Red Light Fever

We have all had moments of epiphany: a moment when a veil uncovers our eyes, blindfolds are removed, an ‘Aha’ moment.

Mine came many years ago in a recording session. We had a 10 song project with plans to finish taping in three weeks. Everyone had full time jobs so we were only able to record in the evenings, three times a week.

I made it through four tunes. By the fifth, I was so over wrought, over thinking my playing, I could not continue. A ringer was hired to finish drum parts for the project.

That experience was the deciding move to home recording. I figured I better get used to that red light which represented active recording enabled.

I work with some folks who have the same challenge. Playing live is not a problem, but putting on a pair of headphones and really hearing every note they play raises blood pressure and handicaps performance. I relate, I get it. Even in today’s recording environment, we still undo our flies and let it hang out. A recording experience can leave a person feeling quite vulnerable, especially second guessing each note that we play.

I have full recording capabilities; my home recording studio is literally a home that is a recording studio. Full keyboard set up by the fire place; the entry way can be used as the vocal booth, with isolation. Upstairs, drums fully miced, a full array of tube and analog preamps, more inputs than I need. A hundred foot snake allows me to utilize each room of my house as a tracking room; complete with independent head phone mixes and talk back capability.

Now it’s a turn around from performance anxiety to idea anxiety. I invited some friends over the other day to lay down ideas at the studio. Call it cavalier confidence; “Hey, if we all get together and lay down some ideas we could get some keeper tracks.” Yeah, right. We breezed through my ideas, afterwards sitting down down to discuss chord structure and arrangements. Then we had dinner.

It’s great being a drummer; a person who hangs out with musicians.

Can we help you in any way?

My Cocoon

As much as possible, I try super hard to shield myself from negativity. Well meaning friends and relatives, seeking sympathy or empathy for their less than positive situations, inadvertently drop their experiences into my refuse pile.

Which brings me to Negativity Bias: negative situations have greater impact on one’s state of mind than a positive situation of similar intensity. Perhaps this explains some of this Covid mass hysteria thing. Hey folks, last I looked there were flowers and grass growing, birds singing, a beautiful sunrise and sunset ( somewhere, anyways ).

Since I have a brain, I prefer to wile away the hours, sniffing at the flowers.

If I am an average of the five people I most closely associate with, then those folks are the average of the five people they most closely associate with, meaning those folks are the average of those five people: exponential ad nauseam. Results: mediocrity, negativity, fear, unmotivation paired with demotivation, lack of expectations; these can become symptomatic to my head space.

Welcome to my cocoon. I am a the expectant caterpillar, metamorphosing into a beautiful butterfly ( I have an aptitude for triteness ). It can only done in a protective sheathe.

Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes Bryan At Mackncheeze

Dylan Hughes – Bass Player, Singer, Songwriter, Composer, Arranger, Producer, Engineer, Educator and Video Host.  Dylan Shares his technical expertise, inspiration and passion for his art. Dylan Hughes Music Dylan Hughes Music Courses The Lover A Love Supreme Mackncheeze Music Bryan at Mackncheeze
  1. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 26: Featuring Dylan Hughes
  2. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 25: Featuring William Kenower
  3. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 24: Featuring Arami Walker
  4. Mackncheeze Music Podcast # 23: Featuring Robert Brewer
  5. Mackncheeze Music Podcast# 22: Featuring Chris Littlefield

Can we help you in any way?

The Good Old Days

Does any one remember rotary phones? My biggest challenge with those phones was lack of privacy. There was no solitude when conversing; who ever was in the kitchen or living room became an audience to conversations with girl friends. I hated that.

I remember my first debit card. It felt like The Beast was taking over civilization, creating minions of mindless citizens who no longer had to count out cash. Now there is currency based on algorithms; who knew.

I finally started talking to Siri. My Iphone face plate needs replacing and I discovered I could open apps by commanding Siri. She is the only person I’m comfortable with not thanking, but still catch myself.

The ultimate good old days: using analog and digital drums for decades before going back to acoustic.

If I’m using a loop or sample, I make my own. It’s first generation and hasn’t had its 2nd and 3rd harmonics erased and then manipulated back. The weird thing – my samples actually punch through the mix with out having to depend on much filtering.

Me, author and perfecter, so to speak.

Can we help you in any way?

Excuses

Excuses are like armpits: everyone has two and they both stink. Doesn’t matter the subject or the situation.

Social media, brother, what a rabbit hole. How many times a day do I check my phone? Leave it up to a former smoker to fidget, having an intense need to have something at my finger tips; a great way to waste time.

Delloitte, a multinational professional services network, conducted a study on smart phone usage. They found out of 270 million smart phone users, each looks at their phone 52 times a day. That is a total of over 14 billion times each day. What a waste of time. How did we survive pre-cell phone?

How about getting lost on the internet? When I first discovered online I would be just ‘Gone’ for hours; lost in front of the screen.

The simple reason I’m not getting anything done – I’m not getting anything done. I allow constant distractions. There isn’t actionable motion; progress is only accomplished one step at a time. Spending my life away on a smart phone isn’t helping.

I started writing a blues tune called Flat Screen Zombies but never finished it. My Facebook feed blew up and, well, you know.

Is there anything we can do to help you?

Mackncheeze Is Now Podcasting

We are now podcasting on seven different platforms: ITunes, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Overcast, Breaker and Radio Public. Just key in Bryan at Mackncheeze on of these podcast stations.

Or, just click on the link..https://anchor.fm/bryan-s-dehart.

In Case You Didn’t Know

We will be posting on You Tube soon.

Can we help you in any way?

Adam Puchalski

Artist Focus

Part Two

Guitar, Song Writer, Recording and Mastering Engineer

https://www.windstudiomusic.com/

Adam: My first experience with digital audio was Voyetra. It was basically a MIDI orchestral arranger. Before Voyetra I was using Cakewalk for its MIDI capabilities.  Do you remember how you discovered MIDI?

Mackncheeze: Yeah.

Adam: A buddy of mine had a Yamaha drum machine.  I had a Casio CZ-101; I still have one.

Mackncheeze: We did an album with a CZ-101.

Adam: The sounds that you can get out of that thing, it’s the only place where you can get those sounds.  We did so much with that thing, so much. 

How I figured out MIDI was that the drum machine had MIDI in and out and I had a set of MIDI cables. The very first thing I did was use the drum machine controlling the keyboard.  From there it was like, “What else can I do?”

From that point on digital audio workstations would combine both the digital element and the MIDI element.  

I was already at the point where I was editing MIDI with Cakewalk, that was before audio was integrated. I was using every component of MIDI, I learned everything that it could do. If the performance wasn’t doing what I wanted I would look at another control to see how I could manipulate the response; that would get me closer to what I was hearing in my head, basically just playing around with numbers. You have the value 0 to 127  in about a thousand different places.  What am I going to do, what are the combinations of 0 to 127 going to be? At the time the possibilities were endless.  

Me: Do you manipulate audio transfer with MIDI?

Adam: Sometimes. One of my songs I took the vocals, I turned it into a MIDI file. I’ve got that file playing strings in unison with the vocals; and it’s dead on.  

Now I consider using MIDI like ketchup; it’s an accoutrement. I don’t like ketchup; I don’t put ketchup on anything but meatloaf. Sometimes I need to make a choice of which is the more direct route to accomplishing my goal.  Sometimes using MIDI is faster, sometimes manipulating the audio is faster. Mostly what I’m doing with MIDI these days is globally tweaking the velocities.  I don’t do the surgical shit I used to.  

I’m glad I know the surgical process because every now and then I’ve got to go in and just change one note.  

Mackncheeze: I’ve never had the patience to go to that level. What made you make the transition to multi-track recording?

Adam: It just kind of happened; probably very slowly. It was one of those things where I just looked back and said, “Ten years ago I was doing that and now I’m doing this.” It wasn’t a conscious process; my abilities would outgrow the equipment that I was using. I’m like,  “Okay, I’ve got to get more money to get more equipment.”

Mackncheeze: Awe, so you’re a gear slut. Tell me about your guitar processor.

Adam:  It’s a DigiTech GSP 2101 which I bought in  1992.  It was really ahead of its time.

This thing is not a modeling preamp, it’s a tube preamp. Every effect that is available is in there; wah to resonance to everything in between. If I could get it done with a tube amp I would use that.  The DigiTech has tube distortion so if I need that crunch it’s there, there is no solid state processing. It sounds like an amp.  

Me: What are your philosophies on recording?

Adam: You have to capture the mood as early as possible; without losing the mood. Get the best sound that you possibly can; get the idea down while the mood is there. The first impression is always the most important. Whatever made you want to record that idea in the first place, you’ve got to capture that, if you can capture that on tape you can recreate it.

You can learn that mood. If you can make it feel the same way, you’ve nailed it. I don’t know if I can actually do that but at least I can capture the mood, the groove and tone that inspired me in the first place. Then I get the euphoria when I do something great, now I’ve got something to build on. 

Mackncheeze: What is your songwriting process?

Adam: Pretty much what I just explained; it’s never planned. Usually I’ll be getting ready to practice, I’ll turn on the amp, I’ll put on a drum loop, drag the loop out for about a hundred measures, and I just start jamming. As I’m playing along something inspires me, I will stop and press record. Most of the songs that I write, if I write a song and finish it, it’s usually right then and there.  From beginning to end I have about 90% of it, the whole concept is there. Every single song is different. 

I have no habits when it comes to songwriting.  I could sit and just jam on rhythms for hours; work with a drum loop and just go. Why? Because it feels good and that’s it.  

Mackncheeze:  What are your current projects?

Adam: I’m working with John Wright, a great friend and great guy.  We first met when he came over to just to do a quick 3 to 4 singer-songwriter type demo. That turned into the Stone Lantern CD.  Nothing that I have written is on that CD. We took the project up to Paradise Sound in Index and had Paul Higgins lay down drums. I did all the mixing and mastering here.

https://www.windstudiomusic.com/stone-lantern

Videos that Joe O’Hearn and I are working on for the Wicked Snake Bite project.  

I’m working with Amy Turner. 

Working with other musicians, it needs to be instinctive. Practice is everything; if you don’t practice you don’t see the results.   

Mackncheeze: Some challenges you face?

These days everything takes time. The other day I was getting mad because I was thinking, “I have to work today but I have no errands to do.” I was thinking I was going to get 3 to 4 hours of practice in. It was 8:30 before I could sit down to do anything; I barely had enough time to warm up. I was too tired and not in the mood anymore. No one’s fault, it’s just the way life is.  

Mackncheeze: Where do you see yourself headed?  What are your motivations?

Adam: My motivation is the same that it has always been; it is to make me happy first. I don’t think of money.  The ultimate goal is to just have some fun and do it.  If I’m in a situation where it’s not fun anymore, if it’s getting too political, or people in the band or arguing the difference between an F or an F#, as far as I’m concerned, pick one or the other, we’re not cutting a Yes album. I refuse to argue about music; it’s not worth it, nor am I interested. I can’t motivate myself for something I’m not interested in.  

If there’s decent money on the table then I might be interested other than just doing it for fun. Money can be as much a motivator as a cool voicing you’ve never played before. “Triads, you want to pay me for triads? What kind of triads do you want?”

Mackncheeze:  So you’re running Sound Forge and Cakewalk? Is that a new version of Cakewalk?

Adam: It’s the new version; it’s the one that Bandlab took over.  Bandlab bought Cakewalk from Gibson after Gibson pretty much abandoned it; they just stop developing it.  I had paid a lifetime licensing fee for it and then Gibson dumped it.  

Mackncheeze: What is it you want to say?

Adam: Music is just for everyone to enjoy, it’s not a competition, it’s not a statement, it’s not a protest. I hate protest music, some great stuff has come from it but I’m not interested in messages.  I’m not against messages, obviously that would be very stupid. I just don’t need a message in the music. I grew up on Van Halen, Rush, AC DC, Judas Priest; I like instrumentals, I like jazz , there’s a lot of country I enjoy,  I love the early days of rap. I can listen to some old Judas Priest and say to myself, “That was pretty Neanderthal wasn’t it?” Did they do a good job of it? Damn right they did; not a lot of deep messages there.  

Good lyrics?  I don’t really hear the words as much as I do the syllables; it’s like I’m color-blind in that way.  I hear the syllable with the notes and if they flow that’s great. I could listen to a song my whole life and not know the words.

I don’t care what the words are, I just want the music to flow.  Someone could ask me what the words to a specific Zeppelin tune are and I’d have to say, I don’t know. If someone starts singing it and I’ll say, “Oh yeah, I know that song.”   If they speak the words I’ll have no idea what the song is. Music is about feeling good, I don’t care about the message.  

As far as my own playing? I’m probably like every other musician, I am my own worst critic. I very rarely like my playing or what I do. If I capture the moment, I like what I did right there, something I can listen back to a lot.  

Mackncheeze: Thanks Adam, that was good stuff.

Is there any way we can help you?

bryan@mackncheezemusic.blog