Adam Puchalski

Artist Focus

Part Two

Guitar, Song Writer, Recording and Mastering Engineer

https://www.windstudiomusic.com/

Adam: My first experience with digital audio was Voyetra. It was basically a MIDI orchestral arranger. Before Voyetra I was using Cakewalk for its MIDI capabilities.  Do you remember how you discovered MIDI?

Mackncheeze: Yeah.

Adam: A buddy of mine had a Yamaha drum machine.  I had a Casio CZ-101; I still have one.

Mackncheeze: We did an album with a CZ-101.

Adam: The sounds that you can get out of that thing, it’s the only place where you can get those sounds.  We did so much with that thing, so much. 

How I figured out MIDI was that the drum machine had MIDI in and out and I had a set of MIDI cables. The very first thing I did was use the drum machine controlling the keyboard.  From there it was like, “What else can I do?”

From that point on digital audio workstations would combine both the digital element and the MIDI element.  

I was already at the point where I was editing MIDI with Cakewalk, that was before audio was integrated. I was using every component of MIDI, I learned everything that it could do. If the performance wasn’t doing what I wanted I would look at another control to see how I could manipulate the response; that would get me closer to what I was hearing in my head, basically just playing around with numbers. You have the value 0 to 127  in about a thousand different places.  What am I going to do, what are the combinations of 0 to 127 going to be? At the time the possibilities were endless.  

Me: Do you manipulate audio transfer with MIDI?

Adam: Sometimes. One of my songs I took the vocals, I turned it into a MIDI file. I’ve got that file playing strings in unison with the vocals; and it’s dead on.  

Now I consider using MIDI like ketchup; it’s an accoutrement. I don’t like ketchup; I don’t put ketchup on anything but meatloaf. Sometimes I need to make a choice of which is the more direct route to accomplishing my goal.  Sometimes using MIDI is faster, sometimes manipulating the audio is faster. Mostly what I’m doing with MIDI these days is globally tweaking the velocities.  I don’t do the surgical shit I used to.  

I’m glad I know the surgical process because every now and then I’ve got to go in and just change one note.  

Mackncheeze: I’ve never had the patience to go to that level. What made you make the transition to multi-track recording?

Adam: It just kind of happened; probably very slowly. It was one of those things where I just looked back and said, “Ten years ago I was doing that and now I’m doing this.” It wasn’t a conscious process; my abilities would outgrow the equipment that I was using. I’m like,  “Okay, I’ve got to get more money to get more equipment.”

Mackncheeze: Awe, so you’re a gear slut. Tell me about your guitar processor.

Adam:  It’s a DigiTech GSP 2101 which I bought in  1992.  It was really ahead of its time.

This thing is not a modeling preamp, it’s a tube preamp. Every effect that is available is in there; wah to resonance to everything in between. If I could get it done with a tube amp I would use that.  The DigiTech has tube distortion so if I need that crunch it’s there, there is no solid state processing. It sounds like an amp.  

Me: What are your philosophies on recording?

Adam: You have to capture the mood as early as possible; without losing the mood. Get the best sound that you possibly can; get the idea down while the mood is there. The first impression is always the most important. Whatever made you want to record that idea in the first place, you’ve got to capture that, if you can capture that on tape you can recreate it.

You can learn that mood. If you can make it feel the same way, you’ve nailed it. I don’t know if I can actually do that but at least I can capture the mood, the groove and tone that inspired me in the first place. Then I get the euphoria when I do something great, now I’ve got something to build on. 

Mackncheeze: What is your songwriting process?

Adam: Pretty much what I just explained; it’s never planned. Usually I’ll be getting ready to practice, I’ll turn on the amp, I’ll put on a drum loop, drag the loop out for about a hundred measures, and I just start jamming. As I’m playing along something inspires me, I will stop and press record. Most of the songs that I write, if I write a song and finish it, it’s usually right then and there.  From beginning to end I have about 90% of it, the whole concept is there. Every single song is different. 

I have no habits when it comes to songwriting.  I could sit and just jam on rhythms for hours; work with a drum loop and just go. Why? Because it feels good and that’s it.  

Mackncheeze:  What are your current projects?

Adam: I’m working with John Wright, a great friend and great guy.  We first met when he came over to just to do a quick 3 to 4 singer-songwriter type demo. That turned into the Stone Lantern CD.  Nothing that I have written is on that CD. We took the project up to Paradise Sound in Index and had Paul Higgins lay down drums. I did all the mixing and mastering here.

https://www.windstudiomusic.com/stone-lantern

Videos that Joe O’Hearn and I are working on for the Wicked Snake Bite project.  

I’m working with Amy Turner. 

Working with other musicians, it needs to be instinctive. Practice is everything; if you don’t practice you don’t see the results.   

Mackncheeze: Some challenges you face?

These days everything takes time. The other day I was getting mad because I was thinking, “I have to work today but I have no errands to do.” I was thinking I was going to get 3 to 4 hours of practice in. It was 8:30 before I could sit down to do anything; I barely had enough time to warm up. I was too tired and not in the mood anymore. No one’s fault, it’s just the way life is.  

Mackncheeze: Where do you see yourself headed?  What are your motivations?

Adam: My motivation is the same that it has always been; it is to make me happy first. I don’t think of money.  The ultimate goal is to just have some fun and do it.  If I’m in a situation where it’s not fun anymore, if it’s getting too political, or people in the band or arguing the difference between an F or an F#, as far as I’m concerned, pick one or the other, we’re not cutting a Yes album. I refuse to argue about music; it’s not worth it, nor am I interested. I can’t motivate myself for something I’m not interested in.  

If there’s decent money on the table then I might be interested other than just doing it for fun. Money can be as much a motivator as a cool voicing you’ve never played before. “Triads, you want to pay me for triads? What kind of triads do you want?”

Mackncheeze:  So you’re running Sound Forge and Cakewalk? Is that a new version of Cakewalk?

Adam: It’s the new version; it’s the one that Bandlab took over.  Bandlab bought Cakewalk from Gibson after Gibson pretty much abandoned it; they just stop developing it.  I had paid a lifetime licensing fee for it and then Gibson dumped it.  

Mackncheeze: What is it you want to say?

Adam: Music is just for everyone to enjoy, it’s not a competition, it’s not a statement, it’s not a protest. I hate protest music, some great stuff has come from it but I’m not interested in messages.  I’m not against messages, obviously that would be very stupid. I just don’t need a message in the music. I grew up on Van Halen, Rush, AC DC, Judas Priest; I like instrumentals, I like jazz , there’s a lot of country I enjoy,  I love the early days of rap. I can listen to some old Judas Priest and say to myself, “That was pretty Neanderthal wasn’t it?” Did they do a good job of it? Damn right they did; not a lot of deep messages there.  

Good lyrics?  I don’t really hear the words as much as I do the syllables; it’s like I’m color-blind in that way.  I hear the syllable with the notes and if they flow that’s great. I could listen to a song my whole life and not know the words.

I don’t care what the words are, I just want the music to flow.  Someone could ask me what the words to a specific Zeppelin tune are and I’d have to say, I don’t know. If someone starts singing it and I’ll say, “Oh yeah, I know that song.”   If they speak the words I’ll have no idea what the song is. Music is about feeling good, I don’t care about the message.  

As far as my own playing? I’m probably like every other musician, I am my own worst critic. I very rarely like my playing or what I do. If I capture the moment, I like what I did right there, something I can listen back to a lot.  

Mackncheeze: Thanks Adam, that was good stuff.

Is there any way we can help you?

bryan@mackncheezemusic.blog

Adam Puchalski

Artist Focus

Part One

Guitar, Song Writer, Recording and Mastering Engineer

https://www.windstudiomusic.com/

Mackncheeze: My very first question, who are you?

Adam: I love music. I do what I say I’m going to do and that nails it.   If I’m going to do it, I’m going to do it; I’m not going to tell you otherwise or act otherwise.

Mackncheeze: What got you started in all this?

Adam: Weed and Kiss. Seriously.  

A friend of mine had an old Sears guitar and a Vox AC 30 amp. We didn’t know what we had.  Before we knew how to make it work we would just turn up the amp feedback on the reverb and throw out  obscenities. We didn’t sound any better than my six-year-old nephew who’s right now trying to learn guitar. We were having a ball; we destroyed the amp and the guitar.

We were sitting in my friend’s bedroom, listening to Kiss and I had the guitar in my hand. I played seven notes, and you know that feeling you get when the music you’re performing is just perfect, you get that high, it was like, “Hey, these things actually work.”   From then on it was like, “Hey, that’s it!” The magic was there.

It’s like being addicted to a drug. Sometimes it happens in the studio, sometimes it happens on stage, sometimes it happens just thinking of an idea. I’ll be in bed thinking about something and telling myself I’ve got to record this thing.

For the rest of my life I’ve always been searching for that feeling. Ultimately, when you are playing music, you’re trying to please yourself. You hope everybody else likes it but if you please yourself then there is success. That’s what it’s all about for me. It’s such a rare occurrence and I’m trying to get back to that point again. I know it’s only going to last a minute or so, and then I spend the next three months trying to make it happen.  

The Younger Adam

The best thing that ever happened was Facebook because the people that really mattered in my life, we are now all back together again.  Most of us stayed involved with music one way or another. We loved every minute of it and still do. We share our projects with one another with a little more expertise than we had when we were younger.  

Mackncheeze: So your high school band experience…

Adam: We had different bands; we weren’t actually doing the high school dance scene or anything. There was a group of us and we knew we were good; we were having fun playing and we knew we could play. 

Mackncheeze: So tell me about your dad…

Adam: My dad is amazing. Growing up we used to hear him every single day just playing scales on piano; all scales and exercises everyday, four hours at a time. We grew up listening to virtuoso practice everyday. It was the way it was and that’s how my father lived.

We would go into Manhattan regularly and my dad would be working on some Off Broadway show. There were always good musicians and good music around the house: classical, jazz, Henry Mancini, Burt Bacharach. He would be listening to this stuff and then just rip it at practice.

I had to know where I stood on the guitar before I realized how astronomically good my father was. There was nothing he couldn’t do. Give him any tune and he could play it stylistically perfect in any interpretation: Fugue, jazz, classical, whatever he felt like doing.   That’s how he played all the time, it was amazing.

Mackncheeze: Did your dad teach you?  Did you go to school?

 Adam: No.

Mackncheeze: Where did you learn all your theory? You know theory backwards and forwards.  

Adam: We were sick of Reno and my friend Bob Knight, who is an amazing bass player, we both moved to Washington. My dad was already here and said there was a pretty good music scene going on.

After we moved to Washington from Nevada, I went to Bellevue Community College for  a year.   I had been playing guitar for four years and playing in bands for regularly three.

 Mackncheeze: What casino was your dad working at in Lake Tahoe?

Adam: His regular gig was playing dinner piano at the top of Harrah’s, but he would also get side gigs at other casinos. Before that he was the piano player and arranger for my grandfather’s band, The Al Tronti Orchestra, at the Sahara Tahoe.  My dad played with Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr., Sonny and Cher, The Jackson 5,  Frank Gorshin, The Carpenters, Phyllis Diller, with whoever. Think of the major acts of that era and he played with them.

The Al Tronti Orchestra

After that my dad had to hustle.  He came to Seattle in about 1982 or 1983 and did a 20-year stint at the SeaTac Holiday Inn playing the main dining room.

I came up in late ’84. When I had first moved to Seattle I took Bob with me to an audition for this band called The Earl White Review.  Bob was getting ready to audition for the band and I was talking to Earl and he found out I was a guitar player. He asked me to bring my guitar and amp to his hotel the next night and I sat down and played with some tapes.

I was playing along with a bunch of tunes he had and he asked me if I wanted to play in the band. I said, “Oh yeah, this will be kind of interesting.” I’d only been playing for four years; I wasn’t a seasoned pro by any means. I had been playing mostly 80’s pop metal, and now all of the sudden I’m playing covers like Tina Turner, Chuck Berry, a huge amount of Motown, some goofy hits from the 40s to the mid-80s.

That was a Tuesday that I took Bob to the audition, it was a Wednesday that I sat in the hotel room and played to the cassette. Thursday I showed up for rehearsal and by Friday the guitar player and the keyboard player were gone.

I didn’t know any songs on the set list and we opened on Friday at the Cotton Club on Martin Luther King way.  We were booked for a week. My plan was to follow along discreetly with the set and try to stay out of everybody’s way until I learned the music. But now I was told I had to carry the whole thing and I didn’t know any of the tunes.  That night we played a lot of Blues.  

I worked with Earl for about a year and then that ended because of extenuating circumstances.  After my tenure with Earl I went to Bellevue Community College.   

That’s where I learned theory. Because I was living with my dad at the time, if I had questions about something that didn’t sound right, he would direct me into the way I needed to go. My dad was an arranger and he was used to writing out music for an entire orchestra. He would do all the copying for each part for each instrument; every bit of it was second nature.  

Mackncheeze: How did you get involved with recording?

Adam: Before I even knew how to play I would plug my guitar into my dad’s stereo quarter inch input.  I didn’t have an amp at the time. It sounded like garbage.  I recorded onto a little Radio Shack cassette thing. I was farting around with the cassette player, I would play something through my dad’s stereo and record it and then I would jam along with the playback. I decided it would be cool if I could record me trying to play along with those cassette recordings; I bought another cassette player.

I had this cheap little mic, I had my little practice amp, I would play back the cassette recording and jam to it and record it onto the other cassette player via the little mic. 

I realized the cassette player had outputs, so I was able to accomplish a multi-track recording by recording one track into the right Channel and another track into the Left Channel. I was 15 years old and I realized I needed to do something else.  I utilized that for a while before I got a 4-track cassette recorder. It was a Tascam Ministudio Porta One, which I still have.  

Mackncheeze: You never got rid of it?

Adam: I keep it because I still have old recordings that I can play back. 

We recorded my dad at Kearney Barton Studios in Lake Forest Park.  His Studio was immaculate. He had a full size grand piano. Hendrix had recorded there a few times, among others, a veritable whose who.

I mastered my dad’s recordings on Cool Edit Pro which was freeware.   I paid 10 or 20 bucks for the pro version in about  1994, 1995. I didn’t know what I was doing; I just winged it and it turned out okay.

That was my first mastering experience.  For that time, it was basically a light version of sound Forge. That was my introduction to a stereo digital audio processing workstation; strictly working with stereo files. That’s when I when I made a distinction between recording and mastering. I was using DOS 2.0; this was before Windows even existed.  

End Of Part One

Is there any way we can help you?

bryan@mackncheezemusic.blog

Happy Holidays

Wishing all a great Holiday Season and a Big Shout Out for all Those Supporting Mackncheeze Music.

Thank You!!!!

What to Expect in the Coming Year.

We are going to be focusing on creative folks of all types in a large variety of different endeavors; Photography, Filmography, Custom Instruments, Writers and, of course, Musicians.

Super excited about the up coming year’s possibilities.

If we can help you, please contact us.

Michael Clune and Moondance

Artist Focus

https://www.facebook.com/Moondance-Van-Morrison-Tribute-1851895661575428

Mackncheeze: Who are you?

Michael: I am my friendships and relationships. I am very blessed that my friendships are from all over the world. My glass of water, I can honestly say, is half full or close to full. I work hard to keep it that way.

Its music, or what I do to motivate myself, or sitting practicing scales, or whatever I want to accomplish.

I am well supported on the planet.

Musically, I have always been drawn to very good vocalists, Stevie Wonder, Billy Joel, Michael McDonald. Motivationally, great jazz players. I’m like every other player; I need inspiration.

I really enjoy a great melody coupled with great vocals. I’ve always been partial to Black Music and Swing. Classic Rock, I would call a squared off sort of rhythmic structure. I have experienced those, and they really don’t do a whole lot for me. I’ve always had swing in my music, one way or another. I was born with a quarter note triplet in my blood.

I have been thinking about the bands I have been with through the 70’s, 80’s, 90’s and Millennials and how much they have really defined what I was doing and accomplishing. The last twenty years I have been trying to focus more on being a singer/songwriter, more of a front line approach.

I am focused on producing videos for my first album, Easy Street, and for current musical projects. Its really the task at hand.

Mackncheeze: What is Moondance?

Michael: A Van Morrison Tribute band, comprised of five really solid musicians who really enjoy Van Morrison’s music. We have great respect for Van who has been recording since the 60’s and even today is doing it at a very high level of success, which is really amazing.

Moondance captures the essence of the really great vibe of Morrison’s poetic ballads and pop tunes. We are not an orthodox tribute band; we don’t play note for note, but we certainly capture the essence, intros and hooks. We also inject solos within the arrangements, because we have accomplished people who know how to improvise.

Mackncheeze: What are your passions?

Michael: As a Berklee drummer, I would like to be playing drums in some sort of intelligent ensemble. I grew up being a drummer and vocalist, for me, those usually went hand in hand.

I just wrote a song called, Say Goodbye, looking forward to recording that. I’ve also recently written a more modern, hip-hop kind of song.

Presently I’m feeling very creative. This year, after taking a trip to Europe and visiting friends in Germany, Poland and Iceland, I had a switch come on. I can be inspired to write music by walking down the street. I’m learning how to make it tangible. Its the combination of things; the video perspective of capturing an image, learning how to listen better, conversations inspiring a lyric or a feeling, something I can visually see.

I love singing. Talk about passion. These ballads, when I sing these songs, I sing them to the bone, I feel them and I think about my own life and how the songs interact with the lyrics.

Presently, it’s an exciting, creative time. Considering the lack of sun in the Northwest, this is a good thing.

Mackncheeze: You are your sun. Whats the most exciting thing you have ever encountered ?

Michael: Helping deliver my daughter. She was born in the back seat of Volkswagen Bug. I was in the backseat with a midwife, as we were on the way to a hospital after forty two hours of labor.

My passion list would actually be long; things that actually changed my life. Moving from the east coast in ’74, ’75. Playing in front of 85,000 people at Seattle’s Bumbershoot when it was in Pioneer Square. In 1986, playing at the World Expo in Vancouver, British Columbia . Bake’s Place, Moondance, August 2019, the only band to sell out the club on a Friday night. Being debt free and a home owner; anomolous for most musicians. There are alot of successes.

My health and my music are somewhat intertwined. Right now it’s about being in the trenches and disciplining myself everyday, everyday. I’m learning that more and more.

Mackncheeze: What are your struggles?

Michael: Writer’s block, that’s been a struggle. I’m trying to write down everything: documenting, documenting, documenting.

Mackncheeze: Anything else?

Michael: I’m really thankful for all my friends. And Jasper, my Maine Coon Cat. What would we do without our cats?

Mackncheeze: Alright, Buddy. Thankyou.

Is there anyway way we can help you?

Practice Safe Sound

Yeah, Baby. I want to keep my hearing. Entropy has decided to work against me, so I fight back.

Every practice session, every rehearsal; ear plugs. Reviewing tracks; I listen at extremely low volumes, often times in mono, mixing off my IPhone, mixing off head phones set across the room, referencing Blue Tooth speakers in close proximity.

At 10 to 15 db, I make sure I can hear every instrument, placed in proper perspective, panning in place.

Here’s an important note: at very low decimal volume, inaccuracies in performance jump out. Not only must the mix sit well at high volume, it must sit well low. High volume playback easily punches, not so much low volume.

Keeping my hearing is crucial.

Depending on the gig I may, or may not, where ear protection. At extremely high volume, yes, definitely. At lower volumes, depends.

A snare hit, even with a bundled stick, can register at 140 db., so it is best to be careful.

For two years I played next to a Marshall Stack. The result was an eardrum which would pop at the slightest high frequency sound. That took years to heal.

I marvel at my fellow players who never even consider protecting their hearing. Those cymbal crashes certainly can’t be fun, especially from the high frequency sizzle. Yikes!

I have great friends who espouse custom fit ear plugs. The cost can be prohibitive. My challenge with those kind of ear plugs is the same as reading glasses, they are easily misplaced. The cheapest hearing protection is toilet paper wadded into my ear canal. Good enough for George Jones, good enough for me.

Is there anything we can do to help?

Hyberbole, Standard Operating Procedure

Aggrandize, to increase the power or reputation of something.

For me, it implies some sort of exaggeration.  It is endemic in the world of music.  Please understand, I am as guilty as the next person when it comes to past pretence.  

I see it in Facebook adds.  I see it in band names.  How many times have you heard that this group of individuals has recording contracts, management, connections and it all turns out to be drivvle?

How about going on tour?  What exactly is a tour?

I have friends that travel hundreds of miles every weekend for a single gig, and never once have they claimed they are on tour.  I have spent month after month after month on the road and the bands I played with never called it a tour.

In an original act I was once with, we did three nights in a another state.  Sure, the semi hauled the staging and lighting out a week before.  Yes we flew out to the gigs.  The band leader told us we were on tour.  I’m like, what are you smoking?  

Sounds like a long weekend to me.  It was. 

Are we really the next greatest thing?  Are we really on the cusp of whatever it is we pretend to be on the cusp of?  

I get that we want to be more important than we appear.  I do think its possible to put aside the BS and be honest about what really is going on in our little worlds.

Lets stop being wannabees.  Only true success attracts true success.  Be real; lets quit pretending to be something we’re not and go out and kick some ass.

Cheers, Go Getters.

If There is anything we can do for you, please get in touch.

JPGMACKNCHEEZE-LOGO-HEADER-FOR-BLOG

 

Habits

I have read the books.  I have stood in front of the mirror yelling at myself.  I have gone to the conferences.  I have read the blogs.  I have reaffirmed my affirmations.  Blah, Blah, Blah, Blah.

I have found out what habit is – its habit.

The daily routine is what moves me forward.  No matter what my day entails, two hours minimum on the drum kit, period.  I wish I had more time but its the best I can do.  Drums are my passion.  Drums are the foundation of everything; my recording studio, my bands, this blog, performance, recording, production, song writing -everything.

If we can help you in any way, please contact us.

bryan@mackncheezemusic.blog

Somewhere, In The Very Early 90’s

By Todd Ainsworth

Writing for a music blog hasn’t been on my radar, but music is one of my passions and an important part of my life. As my generation gets a little older ( I never expected to live to 50 when I was 18 ) and I start to look a little more inward to try to figure out exactly how I got here, I find myself thinking back to that great time in Seattle I was able to experience and be a small part of-the late 80’s and early 90’s

The media called it Grunge and I’m not refusing to call it that ( even though we didn’t call it that as it was happening ) – but I’ll probably get some push back from those who were there ( maybe even at the same shows! ).

It was a hell of a time to be young and freshly able to drink in bars. Plenty has been written who had more to do with what was going on in the Seattle music scene in those days and who actually write for a living ( you can watch “Singles” in your well worn flannel to see Cameron Crowe’s take ), but for what its worth, I’m going to try give you one man’s perspective who spent many a night loitering around Pioner Square and licking fresh hand stamps to get friends in the Off Ramp if they bought a beer.

If we can help you in any way, please contact us.

bryan@mackncheezemusic.blog

Prodigy

So I’m hanging in the lobby waiting for my lesson, listening to what I perceive as a high school student laying down a super congruent groove. I’m saying to myself, ‘Man, I wish I could have played like that when I was 17’. This goes on for another 5 minutes till the groove stops. Super impressive. Wow!!!

My instructor comes out of the lesson room all smiles and excited. In tow ( my jaw hits the floor ) a three year old toddles out, hands clutching drum sticks, all smiles and excited.

My stomach churns and spirit collapses. Bryan, what am I doing? Wasting time, fooling myself, pretending to be something I’m not? Those questions flooding my mind.

Hey, wait a second……I don’t care who you are, there is always someone out there who is more dialed in than yourself. Always! Deal with it, accept it, respond to it with gratefulness.

As for me, I’ll drink some more Cool Aid.

Is there any way we can help you?

bryan@mackncheezemusic.blog

Breakfast of Champions

Rehearsal, 10 am. Hey I got time for breakfast. I’m heading over to the closest breakfast chain anticipating some great morning grub.

Man, I can taste those hash browns with my over easy eggs and some wheat toast with strawberry jelly. Lotsa coffee. I’m in Baby.

8:30 am, I’ve got plenty of time before we get serious. I put in my order. Wait, and wait, and wait, and wait. 9:15, and wait, I can’t get any coffee, and wait.

It figures. This chain, which has been around all of my life, keeps compromising on quality.  

Finally breakfast comes and the portions are skimpy. The check reflects a price that deserved more generosity.

My stomach turns to acid because the food is crap.  In my endeavors, if I deliver a compromised product I deserve the little return I receive.  

My stomach churned at rehearsal. Lesson learned.

We would love to help you. Lets us know if we can.

It’s All About The Gravy

Things I’ve

Learned From Otis

Trust Your Friends

Otis has good friends. Smokey comes to visit from down the street, leaping and bounding because he is so excited to see his buddy Otis. I have never seen two cats so comfortable with one another.

Otis always remembers the humans he likes. As soon as my friends walk in the house he bypasses me and goes directly to them. He always remembers those who are kind to him.

Be Proud of Your Accomplishments and Maintain Priorities

It’s All About The gravy

If the canned food ain’t that great, be sure to eat all the gravy. Make lemonade out of lemons. Find the silver lining in the rain clouds.

Sometimes You Need To Be By Yourself

Too much noise, too much stress. Just remove yourself from all the junk and find someplace quiet.

Be Kind and Gentle To Everyone

Otis never bares his claws. When playing with his friends, or humans, or bugs, he never hurts or eats anyone. The only time he brought a mouse in to the house he let the mouse run around free. No one is worth hurting, or teasing, or eating. All are worthy of life.

Be Direct

The shortest distance between two points is a direct line. Always come in the back door and head for the the front door. Always be forthright and direct. Ask for what you really want and don’t play games. It wastes everyones time.

When Its time to Cuddle Give It Everything You Have

Love is being complete. When you love those around you make sure you give the loudest purr you have. Those we love are precious and they deserve all the love we can can give them.

Is there any thing we can do for you? Please contact us.

Brave New World

Brave New world?

Social media….. Everyone of us who participates willingly hands over every bit of information that our sign up requests.  George Orwell thought it was going to be the state.  Actually, our government does not have to concern itself about our daily activities.

Trade Desk, NASDAQ TTD, tracks all of us.  I walk in to Walmart, consult my cell phone for the best pricing, Trade Desk grabs the info, sells the query to advertisers, the advertisers then send adds on our cell phones to direct us to the best deals.  All this happens in micro seconds.

The Weather Channel, an IBM company, tracks every movement we allow them.  And lets not get started about Amazon, Google and Facebook.  And make sure you stay away from Libra.  Do you want Facebook accessing your bank account?

But heres the deal – these companies have eliminated the gate keepers.  Now, regular schleps like you and me have access to interacting with an audience, bypassing the gate keepers, who previously kept us proletariat types from interacting with vast customer bases.  Those customer bases were the domaine of the elite.

This is liberating.  We can walk through this door and grab every handful of what ever we can grab to enhance ourselves and those we love.  The democratization of media, with some clauses.

I’m taking advantage of every opportunity the new economy provides me.

Knock yourself out Jeff, Mark and Alphabet!!

Cheers Comrade.

Can we help you in any way?

bryan@mackncheezemusic.blog