Sean Fairchild

Artist Focus

Bass, Producer, Engineer, Recording Artist, Singer/Songwriter

Part Two

Endorsed by Genzler Amplification, MTD Basses, GHS Strings, Tsunami Cables, Access Bags and Cases, Bartolini Electronics, Sonic Nuance Electronics 

Sean: As a bassist, I’ve been playing for 25 years.    

I fell in love with the instrument. I quit middle school band. There wasn’t a spot in the school band for an electric bass player. The band director was upset with me because he was a saxophone player. I had been performing in early morning classical quartets with him, and he was grooming me to follow his footsteps.

At that time I became a really, really rebellious teenager. I basically said fuck you to everything, dropped out of band and found my own way.  

My high school musical experience was completely different and was totally wonderful. The band director was a very forward thinking technological guy. His name was Duane Duxbury. He ended up developing a curriculum using digital technology.  This was at Jackson High School in Mill Creek.

At the time it was incredible, totally valuable and I didn’t realize it.  I started building first hand experience with multi track digital recording.  We were recording on High 8 tapes.  It was a digital format that looked like little cassette tapes used for VHS recording.  The unit was a Tascam DA 88 which could record 8 tracks; we also had a DAT Master recorder. The school got a number of the very first CDR drives. I remember being so excited to use it and buying my first blank CD for like 20 bucks in 1997 dollars. It would take 30 minutes to burn 40 minutes of content. 

I got involved with Jazz choir. That was another very serendipitous thing. The Jazz choir director was an opera singer. She was a live stage person but really had no background in jazz. She was unrestrained and was a free spirit. Her name was Janet Hitt. 

At one point I decided I wanted to make my living as a session musician. After high school I directed my studies to ready for that course of action. I planned to move to LA. I studied under Steve Kim; he got me ready for the move.

Mackncheeze:  How was that move to LA?

Sean: ( Laughs ) That’s a whole another long story. In the end it didn’t work. It was the early days of the internet and I had done apartment shopping online. I found a place but had never seen a picture of what I was getting into.

I freaked out when I saw the place I was supposed to live. It did not have a kitchen.  It was one of the few freak-outs I’ve ever had in my life. I decided LA kind of sucked. I was there for 2 weeks.

I came back and finished school, graduated from the University of Washington with a BA in linguistics and a Minor in music. 

The whole experience did not stop me from playing professionally. I’m a hired side man and a recording artist. Now my focus is doing my own solo stuff.  

I have worked hard and I’m starting to get notoriety for the work that I’m doing. My focus now is in composition and recordings.

I had a recent revelation. My time is normally playing with a bunch of different bands. It’s not music that I have a personal stake in. I’m a hired player. It pays a lot of the bills. The realization is that I’m ready to make a pivot away from that.  I convinced myself for so long that was the way to legitimately make money.  

Perhaps I’m still in the process of rediscovering that teenage excitement. For me it’s about having ownership, not playing other people’s parts, not just being a hired player. 

What I’ve learned is that when I’m playing I always speak with my own voice. My favorite players are the ones who come up with their own statements and their own voice.

In a total sense, I really like a lot of chime and attack. I love players like Geddy Lee and Chris Squire and Les Claypool and Flea. I love guys who play with picks; I love present, harmonically rich sound.  

I have always been a band leader, a singer and a front person. As a bass player that is not a commonality.  It’s the way that I express myself in music.  

Mackncheze: Who are you touring and working with.  

Sean: I have a company by the name of Fairchild Sound. It does a number of things, it is my umbrella company for working as a contract player to create videos for a brand. I’m a consultant.  I use it for any sort of business endeavor. It’s really not a lot of what I do. Most of what I do these days is teach and record.

Recently I have been working with Miller Campbell. She is a second cousin of Glen Campbell. I do a lot of regional shows with a Billy Joel and an Elton John tribute band. I play on remote recordings which is the majority of my session work.

Miller Campbell and Sean at the Crocodile

I worked for Behringer for a short time.  This was 7 years ago. When I was working for them at NAMM, we were doing a series where I was interviewing artists all day long. I got to interview Don Randi who is the keyboardist for The Wrecking Crew. He owns The Baked Potato jazz club in Studio City, California. Still playing. Wonderful guy, great guy. Lots of really great stories. For some stupid reason he seemed to to like me.  

In my time with Behringer I was also on the team that did product reviews for salespeople.  We were doing feature walk throughs, like what Sweetwater does.  We were doing this on the equivalent of what, eight years ago, would now be Zoom technology. The stuff was available to the public most of the time and we would put it out on YouTube.

Mackncheeze:  How did you get the gig with Bass Gear magazine.

https://www.bassgearmag.com

As a bass specialist I had been writing reviews because I am incredibly nerdy. I was always into technical aspects of music and gear. I had been writing reviews on Talkbass.com for a long time. I believe the editor saw what I was doing with one of the bass products at NAMM. I received an email from him and he asked,  “If you ever want to do that stuff for us we would love to have you involved.”   I was hugely impressed. I was like,  “Oh my God this is great.”  

It’s a great publication; they care a lot about bass gear. It’s all very technical. It’s the former Bass Player Magazine. They were recently bought out by the UK’s Bass Guitar Magazine.

It used to be in print. By the time I got my first piece published it was the last print edition. I’m excited that I got to see that but also bummed that the print format is gone. At one time the distribution on that was 300,000. That’s globally.  

Things definitely changed when we went online only. One of the things we struggled with is creating a format that makes it feel like a periodical publication. We publish a couple of issues a year. It’s a big collection of reviews, interviews, editorial pieces and stuff like that. It’s graphically laid out to look like an issue of a magazine, which is very cool.  

I go to NAMM every year with those guys. 

End of Part Two

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